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Counseling office enforces new policy

Photo+credit%3A+Viry+Magana
Photo credit: Viry Magana

Photo credit: Viry Magana

Photo credit: Viry Magana

Rebekah Whitfield

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The counseling office means business.

A new policy was created regarding counseling appointments. If a student has missed two appointments in a row, then they will not be allowed to schedule another appointment until they have fulfilled the walk-in obligation.

The policy was put in place to cut down on appointment absences. Many students, according to Osiris Deleon the counseling assistant, would make an appointment and not show up or even call to let the office know that they will not be able to make it.

Deleon says this has been going on for a while, but is something that shouldn’t be an issue.

“The policy changed because we have a high volume of students not showing up for their appointments, not only two, three, four times, it’s consecutive. They make an appointment and never show up. It doesn’t look good at all, and it’s a time that can be used for another student. We had to change the policy so the students can be a little more accountable for their commitments,” Deleon said.

Deleon emphasized how important it is to make an appointment and see a counselor by saying that it is essential if a student wants to graduate in less time. She said that students come in saying that their friend told them what classes they were taking or what classes their mom took when she came to COS.

Deleon explained that the course catalog changes every year and it is important to see a counselor to find out which classes are important for each major.

Deleon also says that students are notified many times through many means that they have a counseling appointment, but students do not pay attention to them.

“I want to give students the benefit of the doubt, however, my experience is students do not pay attention to those details. They get emails with information from the counseling office, but they don’t read their emails. I have students that come in and say ‘I’ve never logged onto my school email and this is my second year,'” Deleon said.

The counseling office has already had to enforce the policy because there are students that have not come to appointments two times in a row. Deleon says that on average, at least 10 students miss an appointment each day, and sometimes that number is higher. She said that very few students call beforehand to let the counseling office know that they will not be able to make their appointment.

Deleon said that students get upset when they find out they cannot make another appointment, but they don’t cause any major problems.

When the students miss an appointment, the counselors begin preparing for the next student. Deleon said that the counselors still get upset because they have spent time pulling up the student’s files and started figuring out how they can best help the student in the small amount of time they have, but when the student doesn’t show up, they have to scratch all that and begin again with the next student.

Meeting with a counselor is essential for students because counselors are the ones that can help students get the right classes for their major and graduate in less time.

“The counselors are the only ones that can give you the best advice. Nobody else can, so don’t do yourself the disservice of listening to your friend instead of listening to someone that has the experience to tell you what the best route is for you,” Deleon said.

Spring registration is coming up in November, so don’t mess up the second part of this year. Visit a counselor today before you pick the wrong class and end up having to stay at COS longer than you have to.

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The student news site of College of the Sequoias
Counseling office enforces new policy